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Learning Together Programme - Foundation PEEP 4s level

Evidence rating
2
Cost rating
1
Review: Foundations for Life, July 2016

The PEEP Learning Together Programme by Peeple is for parents with a child between birth and age five. PEEP for 4s is the fifth level of PEEP and is for parents with children between the ages of four and five.

The programme consists of five, age-specific curricula delivered by PEEP-trained practitioners for 33 weeks during school term-time. Each curriculum teaches parents age-specific skills for supporting their children’s early learning and social and emotional development.

The programme content aims to improve five strands of child development: children’s personal, social and emotional development; communication and language; early literacy development; early numeracy development; and health and physical development. All sessions include talk time, songs and rhymes, sharing books and stories, and things for families to try at home. The content of the sessions is based on the ORIM framework (developed by Peter Hannon and Cathy Nutbrown at the University of Sheffield) to support children’s early literacy.

EIF Programme Assessment

Evidence rating
2

Learning Together Programme - Foundation PEEP 4s level has preliminary evidence of improving a child outcome, but we cannot be confident that the programme caused the improvement.

What does the evidence rating mean?

Level 2 indicates that the programme has evidence of improving a child outcome from a study involving at least 20 participants, representing 60% of the sample, using validated instruments. 

This programme does not receive a rating of 3 as its best evidence is not from a rigorously conducted RCT or QED evaluation.

What does the plus mean?

The plus rating indicates that a programme’s best available evidence is based on an evaluation that is more rigorous than a level 2 standard but does not meet the criteria for level 3. 

Cost rating
1

A rating of 1 indicates that a programme has a low cost to set up and deliver, compared with other interventions reviewed by EIF. This is equivalent to an estimated unit cost of less than £100.

Child outcomes

According to the best available evidence for this programme's impact, it can achieve the following positive outcomes for children:

Supporting children's mental health and wellbeing

Improved self-esteem (cognitive competence) - based on study 1

Improved self-esteem (physical competence) - based on study 1

Enhancing school achievement & employment

Improved verbal comprehension - based on study 1

Improved vocabulary - based on study 1, study 2

Improved letter recognition - based on study 1

Improved letter identification - based on study 2

Improved writing - based on study 2

Learning Together Programme - Foundation PEEP 4s level

Key programme characteristics

Who is it for?

The best available evidence for this programme relates to the following age-groups:

  • Preschool

How is it delivered?

The best available evidence for this programme relates to implementation through these delivery models:

  • Group

Where is it delivered?

The best available evidence for this programme relates to its implementation in these settings:

  • Home
  • Children's centre or early-years setting
  • Community centre

How is it targeted?

The best available evidence for this programme relates to its implementation as:

  • Targeted selective

Where has it been implemented?

Australia, England, Northern Ireland, Portugal, Scotland, Wales

UK provision

This programme has been implemented in the UK.

UK evaluation

This programme’s best evidence includes evaluation conducted in the UK.

Learning Together Programme - Foundation PEEP 4s level

About the programme

What happens during delivery?

How is it delivered?
  • Foundation PEEP 4s level is delivered by two early childhood professionals (QCF-3) to groups of eight families.
  • Foundation PEEP 4s level is delivered in 33 sessions of one-hour duration.
What happens during the intervention?
  • Foundation PEEP teaches parents age-specific skills for supporting their children’s early learning and social and emotional development. All sessions include talk time, songs and rhymes, sharing books and stories and things for families to try at home. The content of the sessions is based on the ORIM framework (developed by Peter Hannon and Cathy Nutbrown at the University of Sheffield) to support children’s early literacy.
  • Sessions two to four focus on learning about writing through play and helping adults to learn to set up play situations where children can write with a purpose.
  • Sessions five to seven focus on improving children’s reading through playing and pretending, by encouraging reading of stories where children can find out about the worlds and lives of other people.
  • Sessions 8 to 10 focus on learning skills in the home which are required to make a confident start at school.
  • Sessions 13 to 15 focus on helping children with early writing, by helping parents to learn strategies to help develop these skills, such as writing slowly when your children are watching and saying the words out loud as you go.
  • Sessions 16 to 18 focus on sharing books regularly at home, to help children to learn how to read.
  • Sessions 19 to 21 focus on helping children to want to learn, and what ways parents, older brothers/sisters and other adults can help to encourage this.
  • Sessions 24 to 26 focus on learning about writing from everyday surroundings.
  • Sessions 27 to 29 focus on helping children to tell their own stories.
  • Sessions 30 to 32 focus on developing children’s self-knowledge and confidence by helping parents to learn to praise children for their efforts as well as their successes.

What are the implementation requirements?

Who can deliver it?
  • The programme is delivered by two practitioners who work with families with children under five, with QCF-3 level qualifications.
What are the training requirements?
  • The practitioners have 14 hours of programme training. Booster training of practitioners is not required.
How are the practitioners supervised?
  • It is not required that practitioners receive supervision.
What are the systems for maintaining fidelity?
  • Training manual
  • Other printed material
  • Other online material
  • Face-to-face training
  • Accreditation or certification process
Is there a licensing requirement?

There is no licence required to run this programme.

How does it work? (Theory of Change)

How does it work?
  • Foundation PEEP is based on the assumption that parental engagement and active participation in learning is important for children’s early social, emotional and cognitive development.
  • Parents experiencing economic and social disadvantage may have more difficulty supporting their children’s early learning at home and at school.
  • During the course of Foundation PEEP, parents learn age-specific skills for supporting their children’s early learning and social and emotional development; children are involved in activities which promote their development, such as listening, talking, and playing.
  • In the short-term, Foundation PEEP aims to improve children’s self-esteem and their positive dispositions to learn (perseverance, curiosity, and confidence).
  • In the longer-term, Foundation PEEP aims to improve children’s educational achievement (children’s literacy and numeracy development), as well as children’s pro-social behaviour.

Contact details

Learning Together Programme - Foundation PEEP 4s level

About the evidence

PEEP for 4s is underpinned by two evaluations with quasi-experimental designs conducted in the UK.

These studies evaluate multiple years of PEEP with the same sample. In the case of study one, the sample is recruited, they experience a prior level of PEEP (PEEP for 3s) and are measured and compared, and then they experience the next PEEP level (PEEP for 4s) and are again measured and compared. In study two, the sample had previously experienced Baby PEEP, PEEP for 1s, PEEP for 2s and PEEP for 3s. This programme report will only describe in detail the findings for this level of PEEP: PEEP for 4s.

Findings which involve any given level of PEEP in conjunction with prior levels of PEEP (ie cumulative findings) are noted below, although they do not feed into the rating of any specific level of PEEP (as these findings aren’t attributable to any one level of PEEP).

Study 1

Citation: Evangelou, M. & Sylva, K. (2003)
Design: QED (samples drawn from matched communities)
Country: United Kingdom
Sample: 164 participants recruited from playgroups in a disadvantaged PEEP catchment area and a matched comparison area in Oxfordshire
Timing: -
Child outcomes: Improved self-esteem (cognitive competence)
Improved self-esteem (physical competence)
Improved verbal comprehension
Improved vocabulary
Improved letter recognition
Other outcomes: None measured

Evangelou, M. & Sylva, K. (2003). The effects of the Peers Early Educational Partnership (PEEP) on Children’s Developmental Progress.  DfES Publications.

Available at
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/0bfd/714e816ea922024af4a4a02963cecb3acbb5.pdf

Cumulative findings
For the sample which participated in PEEP for 3s and PEEP for 4s: improved perceptions of cognitive competence and physical competence.

Study 2

Citation: Evangelou, M., Brooks, G., Smith, S., Jennings, D. (2005)
Design: QED (propensity score matching)
Country: United Kingdom
Sample: 174 PEEP children living in four disadvantaged PEEP neighbourhoods and 303 non-PEEP children living in a matched comparison area
Timing: -
Child outcomes: Improved vocabulary
Improved letter identification
Improved writing
Other outcomes: None measured

Evangelou, M., Brooks, G., Smith, S., & Jennings, D. (2005). Birth to School Study: A Longitudinal Evaluation of the Peers Early Education Partnership (PEEP). 

Available at
http://217.35.77.12/research/england/education/SSU2005FR017.pdf

Cumulative findings
For the sample which participated in PEEP for 2s, 3s and 4s – improved vocabulary, phonological awareness, letter identification and understanding of books and print.

Published March 2017   |   Last updated April 2017