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Hitkashrut

Evidence rating
3
Cost rating
2
Review: Foundations for Life, July 2016

Hitkashrut is an Israeli programme targeting children between the ages of three and five with identified behavioural difficulties.

It is delivered in 14 sessions (2.5 hours' duration each) by Hitkashrut facilitators (trained psychologists) to small groups of parent couples.

It is a co-parent training programme designed to reshape parent-child interactions to reduce conduct problems. Sessions focus on parent-child and couple communication skills, behaviour management, discipline skills and parental self-regulation.

EIF Programme Assessment

Evidence rating
3

Hitkashrut has evidence of a short-term positive impact on child outcomes from at least one rigorous evaluation.

What does the evidence rating mean?

Level 3 indicates evidence of efficacy. This means the programme can be described as evidence-based: it has evidence from at least one rigorously conducted RCT or QED demonstrating a statistically significant positive impact on at least one child outcome.

This programme does not receive a rating of 4 as it has not yet replicated its results in another rigorously conducted study, where at least one study indicates long-term impacts, and at least one uses measures independent of study participants. 

Cost rating
2

A rating of 2 indicates that a programme has a medium-low cost to set up and deliver, compared with other interventions reviewed by EIF. This is equivalent to an estimated unit cost of £100–£499.

Child outcomes

According to the best available evidence for this programme's impact, it can achieve the following positive outcomes for children:

Preventing crime, violence and antisocial behaviour

Improved conduct problems - based on study 1

Improved callous/unemotional traits - based on study 1

Improved effortful control - based on study 1

This programme also has evidence of supporting positive outcomes for couples, parents or families that may be relevant to a commissioning decision. Please see About the evidence for more detail.

Hitkashrut

Key programme characteristics

Who is it for?

The best available evidence for this programme relates to the following age-groups:

  • Preschool

How is it delivered?

The best available evidence for this programme relates to implementation through these delivery models:

  • Group

Where is it delivered?

The best available evidence for this programme relates to its implementation in these settings:

  • Not available

How is it targeted?

The best available evidence for this programme relates to its implementation as:

  • Targeted indicated

Where has it been implemented?

Israel

UK provision

This programme has not been implemented in the UK.

UK evaluation

This programme’s best evidence does not include evaluation conducted in the UK.

Hitkashrut

About the programme

What happens during delivery?

How is it delivered?
  • Hitkashrut is delivered by two educational psychologists (QCF-7/8) to groups of seven parent couples.
  • Hitkashrut is delivered over 14 sessions, of 2.5 hours' duration each.
What happens during the intervention?
  • Sessions focus on parent-child and couple communication skills, behaviour management, discipline skills and parental self-regulation. Each session involves psycho-educational instruction, where facilitators model problematic and optimal behaviour with prepared role plays. This is followed by group discussion and parental role play. The session closes with a summary of take-home points, and the setting of a homework assignment.

What are the implementation requirements?

Who can deliver it?
  • Two practitioners deliver this programme. Both are educational psychologists with QCF-7.
What are the training requirements?
  • The practitioners have 30 hours of programme training. Booster training of practitioners is recommended.
How are the practitioners supervised?
  • It is recommended that practitioners supervised by one programme developer supervisor (qualified to QCF-7/8 level), and one host-agency supervisor (qualified to QCF-6 level).
What are the systems for maintaining fidelity?

Not available

Is there a licensing requirement?

There is no licence required to run this programme.

How does it work? (Theory of Change)

How does it work?
  • Child behavioural problems are rooted in negative and coercive parent/child interactions.
  • During the course of Hitkashrut, parents learn effective positive parenting strategies relating to parent-child and couple communication skills, behaviour management, discipline skills and parental self-regulation.
  • In the short-term, Hitkashrut aims to improve effortful control (executive functions that enable the inhibition of dominant socially inappropriate responses and the activation of subdominant desirable responses) and callous unemotional traits (ie limited empathy and guilt, absence of concern, constricted emotionality).
  • In the longer-term, this will lead to reductions in conduct problems.

Contact details

Professor Yoel Elizur
School of Education
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
yoel.elizur@mail.huji.ac.il

Hitkashrut

About the evidence

Hitkashrut has evidence from one RCT conducted in Jerusalem.

Study 1

Citation: Somech, L. Y. & Elizur, Y. (2012)
Design: RCT
Country: Israel
Sample: 209 parents with a preschool child identified with behavioural problems
Timing: -
Child outcomes: Improved conduct problems
Improved callous/unemotional traits
Improved effortful control
Other outcomes: Decreased distress
Improved marital quality
Improved negative/inconsistent parenting

Somech, L.Y., & Elizur, Y. (2012). Promoting self-regulation and cooperation in pre-kindergarten children with conduct problems: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 51, 412-22. 

Elizur, Y., Somech, L. Y., & Vinokur, A. D. (2016). Effects of Parent Training on Callous-Unemotional Traits, Effortful Control, and Conduct Problems: Mediation by Parenting. Journal of abnormal child psychology, 1-12.

Available at
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0890856712000883
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10802-016-0163-7

Published March 2017   |   Last updated April 2017