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Getting Ready

Evidence rating
2
Cost rating
NA
Review: Foundations for Life, July 2016

Getting Ready is an ecological, child and parent-focused, strengths-based intervention.

The Getting Ready intervention is a process of interacting with families that occurs during all exchanges with them (eg home visits, conferences, informal interactions). It can be implemented in centre-based programmes (eg preschool) or home-visitation programmes (in which families receive weekly visits from a teacher). It is not a curriculum or a packaged, stand-alone programme but is implemented in coordination with existing programmes. It provides early childhood professionals with an approach to working with families to support parent engagement.

Practitioners trained in Getting Ready deliver services to families with children between the ages of two and five years old, and has been delivered as a targeted-selective intervention to low-income families.

EIF Programme Assessment

Evidence rating
2

Getting Ready has preliminary evidence of improving a child outcome, but we cannot be confident that the programme caused the improvement.

What does the evidence rating mean?

Level 2 indicates that the programme has evidence of improving a child outcome from a study involving at least 20 participants, representing 60% of the sample, using validated instruments. 

This programme does not receive a rating of 3 as its best evidence is not from a rigorously conducted RCT or QED evaluation.

What does the plus mean?

The plus rating indicates that a programme’s best available evidence is based on an evaluation that is more rigorous than a level 2 standard but does not meet the criteria for level 3. 

Cost rating
NA

NA indicates that the information required to generate a cost rating is not available at this time.

Child outcomes

According to the best available evidence for this programme's impact, it can achieve the following positive outcomes for children:

Enhancing school achievement & employment

Improved language skills - based on study 1

Preventing crime, violence and antisocial behaviour

Improved social and emotional competencies - based on study 1

Getting Ready

Key programme characteristics

Who is it for?

The best available evidence for this programme relates to the following age-groups:

  • Toddlers
  • Preschool

How is it delivered?

The best available evidence for this programme relates to implementation through these delivery models:

  • Home visiting

Where is it delivered?

The best available evidence for this programme relates to its implementation in these settings:

  • Home
  • Children's centre or early-years setting

How is it targeted?

The best available evidence for this programme relates to its implementation as:

  • Targeted selective

Where has it been implemented?

United States

UK provision

This programme has not been implemented in the UK.

UK evaluation

This programme’s best evidence does not include evaluation conducted in the UK.

Getting Ready

About the programme

What happens during delivery?

How is it delivered?
  • Getting Ready is delivered by early childhood professionals who work in early childhood (infant/toddler and preschool) classrooms (it can also be delivered on a one-on-one basis via home-visitation programmes) and occurs primarily during interactions with families.
  • Getting Ready is delivered over the course of two years in 12 sessions (six meaningful contacts per year in addition to incidental interactions with families).
What happens during the intervention?
  • Getting Ready provides early childhood professionals with an approach to working with families to support parent engagement. It is not a curriculum or a packaged, stand-alone programme but is a process of interacting with families that occurs during all exchanges with them, implemented in coordination with existing programmes.
  • The strategies that comprise Getting Ready are intended to:
    • strengthen relationships between the parent and their child, and between the parent and care educator. The purposes of the four relationship-building strategies are to establish the parent as a warm and sensitive adult who is responsive to their child’s needs, solidify the attachment between parent and child, and create meaningful connections between the parent and educator.
    • build competencies in parents and educators, enabling them to support and scaffold children’s positive development and learning. The purposes of the four competency-building strategies are to bolster parents confidence regarding their parenting practices, gently guide parents in methods for scaffolding their child’s learning, and ensure parents have input on how their children’s learning can best be encouraged at home and other settings.
  • The strategies are used in a fluid manner and are not intended to be practiced in any sequence or order but instead are responsive and flexible, and they work together to support parents and children as they prepare for lifelong learning. The Getting Ready strategies are used across various contexts where parent and child learning occurs. Unstructured contexts include any chance encounters educators may have with parents or settings that are social or informal. Structured contexts or settings are where formal educational discussions and planning occur between an educator or educator and parent.
  • Collaborative planning is a formal process used in structured contexts. The process establishes the notion that parents and educators are mutually responsible for scaffolding a child’s learning and development. Many important topics can be explored through a structured, collaborative process, including individual child strengths, goals shared by parents and early childhood educators, plans for helping the child realise their goals across settings and assessments about whether a child is meeting important goals. Relationship-strengthening and competency-building strategies are embedded in the collaborative planning process.

What are the implementation requirements?

Who can deliver it?

Not available

What are the training requirements?

Not available

How are the practitioners supervised?

Not available

What are the systems for maintaining fidelity?
  • Training manual
  • Other printed material
  • Face-to-face training
  • Booster training
  • Fidelity monitoring
Is there a licensing requirement?

There is no licence required to run this programme.

How does it work? (Theory of Change)

How does it work?
  • Getting Ready is based on the assumption that parental engagement and active participation in learning is important for children’s early social, emotional and cognitive development.
  • Parents experiencing economic and social disadvantage may have more difficulty supporting their children’s early learning at home and at school.
  • Getting Ready to learn focuses on parent engagement with their child and the parent-educator partnership.
    • Parent engagement efforts focus on guiding parents to engage in warm and responsive interactions, encourage their children’s autonomy, and participate in children’s learning.
    • Parent-educator partnership efforts focus on supporting parents and educators in individualised, collaborative interactions to jointly facilitate children’s cognitive, language and social-emotional development.
  • In the short-term, Getting Ready aims to improve parenting behaviours and children’s early social, emotional and cognitive skills.
  • In the longer-term, Getting Ready aims to improve school readiness.
Getting Ready

About the evidence

Getting Ready has evidence from a single cluster RCT conducted in the USA.

Study 1

Citation: Sheridan et al (2010); Sheridan et al (2011); Sheridan et al (2014)
Design: Cluster RCT
Country: United States
Sample: 29 Head Start classrooms involving 217 children
Timing: -
Child outcomes: Improved language skills
Improved social and emotional competencies
Other outcomes: None measured

Sheridan, S. M., Knoche, L.L., Edwards, C.P., Bovaird, J., & Kupzyk, K. A. (2010). Parent engagement and school readiness: Effects of the Getting Ready Intervention on preschool children’s social-emotional competencies and behavioural concerns. Early Education and Development. 21, 125-156. 

Sheridan, S. M., Knoche, L. L., Kupzyk, K.A., Edwards C. P., & Marvin, C. A. (2011). A randomized trial examining the effects of parent engagement on early language and literacy: The Getting Ready Intervention.  Journal of School Psychology, 49, 361-383. 

Sheridan, S. M., Knoche, L.L., Edwards, C. P., Kupzyk, K. A., Clarke, B. L., & Moorman Kim, E. (2014). Efficacy of the Getting Ready Intervention and the role of parental depression. Early Education and Development, 25, 746-769. 

Available at
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10409280902783517
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002244051100015X
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10409289.2014.862146

Published March 2017   |   Last updated April 2017